Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
  Users Online: 3673 Home | About the Journal | InstructionsCurrent Issue | Back IssuesLogin      Print this page Email this page  Small font size Default font size Increase font size
REVIEW: MANAGEMENT UPDATES
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 254-263

Examination of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis: A problem-orientated approach


Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, USA

Correspondence Address:
Henry F McFarland
Neuroimmunology Branch, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-2327.58284

Rights and Permissions

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has brought in several benefits to the study of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). It provides accurate measurement of disease activity, facilitates precise diagnosis, and aid in the assessment of newer therapies. The imaging guidelines for MS are broadly divided in to approaches for imaging patients with suspected MS or clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) or for monitoring patients with established MS. In this review, the technical aspects of MR imaging for MS are briefly discussed. The imaging process need to capture the twin aspects of acute MS viz. the autoimmune acute inflammatory process and the neurodegenerative process. Gadolinium enhanced MRI can identify acute inflammatory lesions precisely. The commonly applied MRI marker of disease progression is brain atrophy. Whole brain magnetization Transfer Ratio (MTR) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) are two other techniques use to monitor disease progression. A variety of imaging techniques such as Double Inversion Recovery (DIR), Spoiled Gradient Recalled (SPGR) acquisition, and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) have been utilized to study the cortical changes in MS. MRI is now extensively used in the Phase I, II and III clinical trials of new therapies. As the technical aspects of MRI advance rapidly, and higher field strengths become available, it is hoped that the impact of MRI on our understanding of MS will be even more profound in the next decade.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3485    
    Printed157    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded212    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 13    

Recommend this journal