Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 31-34

Sleep in Wilson's disease: Questionnaire based study


1 Department of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, India
2 Department of Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
Sanjib Sinha
Additional Professor of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Hosur Road, Bangalore - 560029
India
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DOI: 10.4103/0972-2327.78047

PMID: 21633612

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Objective: We proposed to detect sleep abnormalities in Wilson's disease, (WD) using sleep questionnaires. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients (M:F = 18:7; age: 24.4 ± 9.2 years) with WD and 24 controls (all males; age: 33.1 ± 9.7 years) were recruited. They underwent phenotypic/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation followed by administration of Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) questionnaires. Results: The mean age at presentation and diagnosis was 24.4 ± 9.2 and 17.6 ± 7.5 years, respectively. The duration of illness at diagnosis was 14 ± 21.9 months. On PSQI, 15 patients with WD had abnormal PSQI scores of >5 as compared to 6 patients among the controls. The mean PSQI score was significantly more (P = 0.03) in patients compared to the controls. The PSQI worst scores were noted only in WD. Evaluation with ESS showed that three patients with WD scored >10/24, while two among the controls qualified for excessive daytime sleepiness. Overall, assessment by sleep questionnaires detected abnormality in 16 patients with WD as compared to 8 controls (P = 0.004). Subgroup analysis revealed that patients whose duration of illness was >8 years and who were on decoppering treatment had significantly lesser excessive daytime somnolence. Conclusions: Sleep disturbances were observed more often in WD than in controls. Better designed studies will provide a better understanding.


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