Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 107-110

Schistosomal myeloradiculopathy due to Schistosoma mansoni: Report on 17 cases from an endemic area


1 Department of Neurosurgery, Mansoura University, Egypt
2 Department of Neurology, Mansoura University, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Hassan H Salama
Department of Neurology, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-2327.82796

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Background: After malaria, schistosomiasis is the second most prevalent tropical disease. The prevalence of oviposition in CNS of infected persons varies from 0.3 to 30%. The conus medullaris is a primary site of schistosomiasis, either granulomatous or acute necrotizing myelitis. Objective: To report the clinical, radiological, and laboratory results of spinal cord schistosomiasis (SCS) and to design proper therapeutic regimens. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients (13 males and four females) with SCS were enrolled between 1994 and 2009 at Mansoura University Hospitals. Their median age at diagnosis was 19 years (13-30 years). Independent neurological, radiological, and laboratory assessments were performed for both groups, excluding pathological confirmation that was done earlier in eight patients (Group 1). In the group 2 (nine patients), indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test for bilharziasis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was performed. Higher positive titer in CSF than serum indicated SCS plus induction of antibilharzial and corticosteroid protocols for 12 months with a three-year follow-up. Results: Rate of neurological symptoms of granulomatous intramedullary cord lesion was assessed independently in 16 cases and acute paraparesis in one case. All patients in group 2 had positive IHA against Schistosoma mansoni with median CSF and serum ranges 1/640 and 1/320, respectively. Seven patients (41.18%) had complete recovery, eight patients (47.06%) showed partial recovery, and no response was reported in two patients (11.76%) (P = 0.005). There was no recorded mortality in the current registry. Conclusions: Rapid diagnosis of SCS with early medical therapies for 12 months is a crucial tool to complete recovery.


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