Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 177-180

Neuropsychological markers of mild cognitive impairment: A clinic based study from urban India


1 Department of Psychology, Narayana Health, Mazumdar Shaw Medical Centre, Bangalore, India
2 Department of Clinical Psychology, NIMHANS, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Psychiatry, NIMHANS, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Biostatistics and Psychiatry, NIMHANS, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Srikala Bharath
Professor of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-2327.150566

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Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a transitional stage between normal aging and dementia. Persons with MCI are at higher risk to develop dementia. Identifying MCI from normal aging has become a priority area of research. Neuropsychological assessment could help to identify these high risk individuals. Objective: To examine clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of neuropsychological measures in identifying MCI. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 42 participants (22 patients with MCI and 20 normal controls [NC]) between the age of 60 and 80 years. All participants were screened for dementia and later a detailed neuropsychological assessment was carried out. Results: Persons with MCI performed significantly poorer than NC on word list (immediate and delayed recall), story recall test, stick construction delayed recall, fluency and Go/No-Go test. Measures of episodic memory especially word list delayed recall had the highest discriminating power compared with measures of semantic memory and executive functioning. Conclusion: Word list learning with delayed recall component is a possible candidate for detecting MCI from normal aging.


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