Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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Year : 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 523-527

Efficacy and tolerability of the modified Atkins diet in young children with refractory epilepsy: Indian experience


1 Department of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Neonatal, Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Division of Pediatric Neurology, BL Kapur Super Speciality Hospital, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Suvasini Sharma
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi - 110 001
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-2327.194463

Clinical trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01828437

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Background: The modified Atkins diet (MAD) has been used predominantly in older children, adolescents, and adults. There is a paucity of data on the use of the MAD in refractory epilepsy in young children. Objectives: This study was planned to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of the MAD in refractory epilepsy in young children. Methods: This study recruited children aged 9 months to 3 years with refractory seizures. Children received MAD for 6-month with the on-going anticonvulsant medications being continued unchanged. Reduction in seizure frequency was the primary outcome measure. Adverse effects were also studied. Results: Thirty-one children with daily seizures were studied with a median age of 18-month (range 9-30 months). West syndrome was the most common epilepsy syndrome (26, 86.6%). Twenty-one children remained on diet at 3 months and 13 at 6 months. The children who achieved >50% seizure reduction were 17 (54.8%) at 3 months and 9 (29%) at 6 months. Refusal to eat was a significant problem seen in eight children. Three children discontinued the diet due to adverse effects. Conclusion: The MAD was found to be feasible, effective, and well-tolerated.


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