Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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Neuro-developmental and epilepsy outcomes of children with west syndrome: A cross-sectional study from North India


1 Department of Pediatrics, Lady Harding Medical College and associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Pediatric Neurology, Lady Harding Medical College and associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India
3 Department of Pediatric Neurology, Lady Harding Medical College and associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, India; Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Suvasini Sharma,
Department of Pediatric Neurology, Lady Harding Medical College and associated Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/aian.AIAN_503_18

Objectives: To assess the neurodevelopmental outcome of West syndrome (WS) in Indian children, who differ in their clinical profile from the western population. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled children aged 2--5 years with prior diagnosis of WS between November 2013 and March 2015. They were assessed for epilepsy outcome and developmental outcome using developmental profile 3 (DP3) and vineland adaptive behavioral scale II (VABS II). Results: Sixty-one children were enrolled. Perinatal asphyxia (40.9%), neonatal hypoglycemia (14.8%), and neonatal meningitis (9.8%) were predominant causes among the children with known etiology. Favorable epilepsy outcome (seizure freedom for >6 months) was observed in 29/61 patients (47.5%). Moderate to severe developmental delay was observed in 55/61 children (91.8%). Favorable developmental outcome (GDS by DP3 >70) was observed in just 5/61 (8%) patients. Conclusions: This study highlights the high prevalence of developmental delay in this population of children with WS, with adverse perinatal events being the most common etiology.


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    -  Gupta J
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