Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology
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Cerebral venous thrombosis, seasonal trends, and climatic influence: A region-specificstudy


1 Department of Neurology, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Biostatistics, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
3 Department of General Medicine, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
4 Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India
5 Department of Community Medicine, Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

Correspondence Address:
Sanjith Aaron,
Department of Neurology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu - 632004
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/aian.AIAN_409_19

Background and Purpose: Studies looking at seasonal variation on cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) are few with conflicting conclusions. In this region-specific study, we looked for climatic influence and seasonal trends on the incidence of CVT. Methods: Imaging proven adult CVT cases treated over a period of 18 years from a specific geographical location with similar seasons and climatic conditions were studied. Metrological parameters prepared using 30 years of data was used. Quantum geographical information system (QGIS software) and SPSS v 22 were used for patient plotting and analysis. Results: Total of 970 cases were studied. The incidence was significantly higher in summer 411 (42.3%) compared with autumn 317 (32.7%) and winter 242 (25.05); P= 0.038. This trend was consistent across all the 18 years in time series analysis. Mean age was 33.5 years (range 18–88 years). A significant majority 673 (69.4%) were below 40 years of age; P= 0.012. Females constituted 394 (40.6%) of cases. Postpartum CVT cases constituted 237 (30%). Interaction analysis showed younger age (<40 years) were more vulnerable for CVT in summer; P= 0.009. There was no seasonal influence on postpartum CVT. Apart for a weak positive correlation between rain fall (r = 0.18, P< 0.01); humidity and cloud cover was not influencing the incidence. Conclusions: Higher ambient temperatures were consistently associated with higher incidence of CVT. This is the largest region-specific study on CVT in the world. These results may be applicable to other regions with similar climatic conditions.


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